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  • Debora Wattenburg

Do I need a Pneumonia booster shot?

We were recently asked about Pneumonia booster shots and if they are necessary for those of us who are over 64 years old. The following was taken directly from the CDC website. Please note that recommendations are different depending on age and health and please consult with your primary care provider before receiving this vaccination.


The CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all adults 65 years or older. See Pneumococcal Vaccine Timing for Adults pdf icon[5 pages] for additional details.


There are 2 types of pneumococcal vaccines available in the United States:

  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar13®)

  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax23®)

PCV13 PPSV23 helps protect you against 13 different strains of pneumococcal bacteria helps protect you against 23 different strains of pneumococcal bacteria usually given four separate times to children under two generally given once to anyone over 64 generally given only once to adults older than 64 or adults older than 19 if they have an immune condition given to anyone over 19 who regularly smokes nicotine products like cigarettes (standard or electronic) or cigars


All adults 65 years or older should receive 1 dose of PPSV23. In addition, clinicians should consider discussing PCV13 vaccination with their adult patients 65 years or older who do not have an immunocompromising condition†, cochlear implant, or cerebrospinal fluid leak and who have never received PCV13 before. When patients and clinicians engage in shared clinical decision-making for PCV13 use, considerations may include the individual patient’s risk of exposure to PCV13 serotypes and the risk of pneumococcal disease for that individual because of underlying medical conditions.

  • For adults 65 years or older who do not have an immunocompromising condition, cerebrospinal fluid leak, or cochlear implant and want to receive PPSV23 ONLY:

o Administer 1 dose of PPSV23.

· Anyone who received any doses of PPSV23 before age 65 should receive 1 final dose of the vaccine at age 65 or older. Administer this last dose at least 5 years after the prior PPSV23 dose.


For adults 65 years or older who do not have an immunocompromising condition, cerebrospinal fluid leak, or cochlear implant and want to receive PCV13 AND PPSV23:

· Administer 1 dose of PCV13 first then give 1 dose of PPSV23 at least 1 year later.

· Anyone who received any doses of PPSV23 before age 65 should receive 1 final dose of the vaccine at age 65 or older. Administer this last dose at least 5 years after the prior PPSV23 dose.

· If the patient already received PPSV23, give the dose of PCV13 at least 1 year after they received the most recent dose.


For anyone with any of the conditions listed below who has not previously received the recommended pneumococcal vaccines: Cerebrospinal fluid leaks

  • Cochlear implant(s)

  • Sickle cell disease or other hemoglobinopathies

  • Anatomic or functional asplenia

  • Congenital or acquired immunodeficiency

  • HIV infection

  • Chronic renal failure or nephrotic syndrome

  • Leukemia or lymphoma

  • Hodgkin disease

  • Generalized and metastatic malignancies

  • Iatrogenic immunosuppression, including radiation therapy)

  • Solid organ transplant

  • Multiple myeloma


CDC recommends you:

  • Give 1 dose of PCV13 first.

  • Give 1 dose of PPSV23 at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose and at least 5 years after any prior PPSV23 dose.

  • Anyone who received any doses of PPSV23 before age 65 should receive 1 final dose of the vaccine at age 65 or older.



Footnote

† Immunocompromising conditions include: chronic renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, immunodeficiency, iatrogenic immunosuppression, generalized malignancy, human immunodeficiency virus, Hodgkin disease, leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, solid organ transplants, congenital or acquired asplenia, sickle cell disease, or other hemoglobinopathies.


Always consult with your primary care provider before receiving this vaccination.



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